Energy

Power with a purpose

SPEA’s Energy concentrations build on knowledge and skills introduced in the core curriculum and applies them to issues in the energy sector. You will learn the life cycle of energy resources and study the economics of energy production and consumption. In addition, you’ll explore the feasibility of various tools and techniques for mitigating carbon emissions, diversifying the energy sector, and developing innovative energy technologies to address sustainability and climate change.

You will gain a firm grasp of the qualitative and quantitative skills necessary for critical analysis in the professional world. Important skills include multidisciplinary policy research, risk communication, statistical data analysis and modeling, and microeconomics.

Master the fundamentals, then add depth and detail—with multiple energy degree avenues

You can study energy through SPEA’s MPAMSES, or dual MPA-MSES programs. MPA students will focus primarily on economics-based quantitative methods, behavioral science contributions to energy production and conservation projects, and the application of qualitative and quantitative methods in community settings.

MSES students that pursue the energy concentration can anticipate more quantitative coursework, more integration of science and policy, and technology-oriented classes covering specific energy resources. 

MPA

As an MPA student studying Energy, you'll begin by mastering the MPA program’s core competencies. These five courses (15 credit hours) will give you well-developed analytical skills and a broad understanding of policy issues and government processes. In addition to these highly transferable core skills, the energy concentration includes two required courses. The remainder of your course work comes in four elective courses—two chosen from each of the two topic areas.

  • Energy Analysis and Markets (E 574)
  • Energy Economics and Policy (R 674)

The required energy economics course provides a global and regional understanding of energy markets and the skills necessary to perform policy analysis of energy issues. The technical courses in the concentration will enable you to collaborate with engineering specialists on projects related to energy production, management, conservation, and research and development. 

  • Fundamentals of Air Pollution (E 515)
  • Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (E 518)
  • Environmental Chemistry (E 536)
  • Application of Geographic Information Systems (E 529)
  • Natural Gas: Technical and Policy Challenges (E 503)
  • Physical Climatology (GEOG-G 532)
  • Climate Change (GEOG-G 576)
  • Principles of Petroleum Geology (GEOL-G 571)
  • Organic Geochemistry (GEOL-G 587)
  • Human Behavior and Energy Consumption (E 501)
  • Public Natural Resources Law (R 533)
  • International Environmental Policy (E 535)
  • Energy Policy: A Nation-State Perspective (E 590/V 550)
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis(P 541)
  • Climate Law and Policy (LAW-L 660/V 550)
  • Sustainable Development (S 596)
  • Environmental Economics and Policy (R 625)
  • Natural Resource Management and Policy (R 643)
  • Environmental Law (R 645)
  • Energy Law and Policy (LAW-L 644/V 550)

MSES

You’ll begin by mastering the fundamentals reflected in the MSES program’s core competencies—15 credit hours encompassing the rigor and breadth that employers seek. In addition to these highly transferable core skills, the energy concentration includes two required courses. The remainder of the course work comes in 12 credit hours of electives, where you can tailor your Energy program to your own specific interests. Two of your elective courses must be in the natural sciences and two in economics, public policy, or law. 

  • Energy Analysis and Markets (E 574)
  • Energy Economics and Policy (R 674)

The required energy economics course provides a global and regional understanding of energy markets and the skills necessary to perform policy analysis of energy issues. The technical courses in the concentration will enable you to collaborate with engineering specialists on projects related to energy production, management, conservation, and research and development. 

  • Natural Gas: Technical and Policy Challenges (E 503)
  • Fundamentals of Air Pollution (E 515)
  • Vector-based Geographic Information Systems (E 518)
  • Application of Geographic Information Systems (E 529)
  • Physical Climatology (GEOG-G 532)
  • Principles of Petroleum Geology (GEOL-G 571)
  • Climate Change (GEOG-G 576)
  • Organic Geochemistry (GEOL-G 587)
  • Human Behavior and Energy Consumption (E 501)
  • International Environmental Policy (E 535)
  • Energy Policy: A Nation-State Perspective (E 590/V 550)
  • Benefit-Cost Analysis (P 541)
  • Public Natural Resources Law (R 533)
  • Environmental Economics and Policy (R 625)
  • Natural Resource Management and Policy (R 643)
  • Environmental Law (R 645)
  • Sustainable Development (S 596)
  • Energy Law and Policy (LAW-L 644/V 550)
  • Climate Law and Policy (LAW-L 660/V 550)

Additional opportunities to specialize and collaborate, no matter which path you choose

Combining your energy concentration with another concentration—such as environmental policy and natural resource management, environmental management or sustainability and sustainable development—can offer unique career advantages. Our faculty will work to accommodate your specialized professional interests as they help you design your program.

Numerous IU departments offer valuable courses related to the energy concentration including Geological Sciences, Geography, Physics, Economics, and various social sciences. Geological Science courses offer detailed study of the formation of energy resources. The Physics and Geography departments offer courses that address climate change science. Social science courses offer additional opportunities to study research methods and survey design. If you are interested in business management or finance, it may be possible for you to take courses in the Kelley School of Business.

You can join the SPEA Energy Leaders Student Association (ELSA), a professional student organization for the energy concentration that offers networking and current information on events in the energy industry.

Get involved with ELSA

Faculty with expertise and experience in energy

Shahzeen Z. Attari
Assistant Professor

sattari@indiana.edu
(812) 855-1467
SPEA 347

  • Human behavior and resource use
  • Environmental psychology
  • Social dilemmas

Sanya Carley
Associate Professor

scarley@indiana.edu
(812) 856-0920
SPEA 353

  • Energy Policy and Economics
  • Electricity Markets
  • Applied Econometrics
  • Policy Instruments
  • Renewable Energy and Distributed Generation
  • Energy-based Economic Development

John A. Rupp
Adjunct Instructor, SPEA

rupp@indiana.edu
(812) 855-1323
Indiana Geological Survey S119

  • Subsurface Geology
  • Unconventional Reservoir Analysis
  • Carbon Sequestration
  • Fracking, induced seismicity, oil, gas, petroleum
  • History of oil and gas in Indiana
  • Stratigraphy